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Introvision in Coaching (part 3)

Tips for the application of Introvision

  1. Practice acknowledging attentive perception (AAP): e.g. with this guide by Norbert Distler on InsightTimer: insig.ht/ gm_87711 
  2. Attunement to arrive: To clarify the intention , ask the coachee or coachees, "Take a wide inner posture and look at the question: when would this session be helpful for you?" 
  3. Practicing AAP as a coach yourself: Acknowledging attentive perception supports you to go along well with the process - and to better put aside your own preoccupations and expectations, as well as to be open to the signals of the other person 
  4. Give time and space: Allow your coachee plenty of time for the AAP and observe gestures and facial expressions carefully. Often you can tell from a change that new thoughts are emerging.
  5. Integrate the feeling of being stuck:  "It may be that we are not getting anywhere right now .... If you apply AAP to this, where is the center of unpleasantness?" 
  6. Integrate body sensations directly into the process: e.g. „It may be that you now feel pressure in your stomach / that an inner fog appears / .... If you perceive this in a wide mode, where is the center of unpleasantness?"
  7. Start quickly: A quick diving into the introvision process is helpful so that the coachee can experience the method swiftly. 
  8. Get permission: Clarify with the coachee in advance that you will interrupt conflict avoidance strategies (CAS) like ignoring, glossing over, trivializing, rationalizing, theorizing .... 
  9. Repeat literally: To activate the individual memory areas, it is extremely important to integrate exactly the coachee's words. They function like a key to his memories. This is a challenge for those who are used to summarizing in their own words. 
  10. Formulate briefly: It is best to name sub- cognitions in just one sentence: "It may be that you seem incompetent in this situation." 
  11. Postpone finding solutions: The search for solutions comes after the Introvision process. Drifting away during it distracts from the emotional experience.

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